Running with the Devil 101

John Camp discusses the how-to’s of covering a riot as Main Street Media or a Citizen Journalist and breaks it down into 8 simple rules, How To Cover a Riot.

I find his description of CJ’s pretty amusing “… and the sort of Off-Broadway Media, and the Off-Off Broadway media, and the Far-Off Broadway media.” Heh.

I think his rule #3 could have helped a lot of our local CJ’s that ended up gassed.

3. Always — ALWAYS! — know where the Little Assholes are. Most people in protest mobs are pretty sincere, and don’t want to fight cops or break things. But there’s a subset of most any anti-war mob, the LAs, who are similar to the football hooligans in Britain

 The only thing I can think of that he missed is find a good vantage point and have great equipment, but that’s not always an option.

Anything you can think of that he missed?

3 Comments so far

  1. travisn on September 4th, 2008 @ 12:53 pm

    How about find the organizers? While the best photos may come from the LAs the organizers of the march are where the story is at. You can see why the mob was disorganized, how they were trapped, how they were (non)violent and even if they provoked or did not provoke the police.

    I am fairly displeased with the coverage coming from Metblogs. While there may have been altercations where the police were provoked, there were some that were unprovoked (unless an altercation 2 hours previously in a different section of town by people that were presently in custody counts as provocation) yet this nuance is lost by this coverage.


  2. David (jacc) on September 4th, 2008 @ 12:58 pm

    How about find the organizers?

    Travis, that’s a good one!

    Also, from a story perspective, Jason DeRusha made a good point about looking for stories besides the protesters. With 10,000 people on a protest march there certainly has to be a lot of stories besides the one created by a small subset of the group.


  3. Erica M (ericam) on September 4th, 2008 @ 1:01 pm

    While there may have been altercations where the police were provoked, there were some that were unprovoked (unless an altercation 2 hours previously in a different section of town by people that were presently in custody counts as provocation) yet this nuance is lost by this coverage.

    You’re saying we’re not giving enough attention to overreaction by the police? ‘Cause I agree that that’s certainly been the case. And there are plenty of first-person accounts out there of uncalled for police behavior, just like there are plenty of accounts of peaceful protest. I’d rather just keep directing people to The Uptake and MnIndy.



Terms of use | Privacy Policy | Content: Creative Commons | Site and Design © 2009 | Metroblogging ® and Metblogs ® are registered trademarks of Bode Media, Inc.